Interference Journal Issue 3

Frauke Behrendt
Michael Bull
Kim Cascone
Steven Connor
Fionnuala Conway
Steve Coleman
Linda Doyle
Marcia Epstein
Mark Fisher
Mick Grierson
Mark Grimshaw
Paul Hegarty
Brandon LaBelle
Takuro Mizuta Lippit
Martin McCabe
Frances Morton
Nye Parry
Pedro Rebelo
Franziska Schroeder
Jonathan Sterne
Tim Stott
Atau Tanaka
TeZ (Maurizio Martinucci)
Barry Truax
Mick Wilson

Frauke Behrendt

Frauke Behrendt’s research interests include the areas of digital cultures, sound studies, mobility and media theory. Her research combines empirical and theoretical investigations of the link between mobility, sound and media and how this is articulated both in contemporary art and in everyday live.
Frauke is on the Steering Committee of the European COST Action on ‘’Sonic Interaction Design’ and of the International Workshop of Mobile Music Technology. In addition, she is a member of NYLON (international research network in sociology, history and cultural studies), and the ‘Centre for Material Digital Culture’ (Sussex University). Frauke has presented and published her research widely and is frequently invited to talk at international conferences.
For more information see http://www.fraukebehrendt.com

Michael Bull

Michael Bull is a Reader in Media at the University of Sussex and has written widely on sound, music and technology. He is the author of Sounding Out the City. Personal Stereos and the Management of Everyday Life (Berg 2000), Sound Moves: iPod Culture and Urban Experience (Routledge 2007) and is co-editor of The Auditory Culture Reader (Berg 2003) He is also the co-founder of The Senses and Society Journal (Berg), He is currently editing a four volume Routledge Major Works Series on Sound Studies.

Kim Cascone

Cascone studied electronic music at the Berklee College of Music and the New School in Manhattan. He founded Silent Records in 1985 and has released more than 30 albums of electronic music on Silent, Sub Rosa, Mille Plateaux and Raster-Noton. Cascone has performed with Merzbow, Keith Rowe, Scanner, John Tilbury, Tony Conrad, Pauline Oliveros and worked on two David Lynch films as Assistant Music Editor. Cascone founded the microsound list in 1999 and has written articles on post-digital aesthetics for Computer Music Journal and Contemporary Music Review.

Steve Coleman

Steve Coleman is Lecturer in Anthropology at NUI Maynooth. He has a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Chicago. His PhD research was conducted in the Irish Gaeltacht on the history, politics, performance practices, and discourse of Irish-speakers. Current research interests include the anthropology of the senses, ethnomusicology, performance, semiotic and linguistic anthropology, and the causes of and responses to the financial crisis. He is the co-author of the book The End of Irish History? Critical Reflections on the Celtic Tiger (Manchester U. Press 2003), and is an Associate Editor of the Journal of Linguistic Anthropology.

Steven Connor

I was born in Bognor Regis, Sussex, in 1955. From 1966 to 1972 I attended Christ’s Hospital School, where I learned to play the guitar by copying Roger Allam. The motto over the Library door read Turpe nescire. Following my expulsion, I spent a year at Bognor Regis Comprehensive School. In 1973, I went up to Wadham College, Oxford, to read English, with Terry Eagleton as my tutor. After completing my BA, with a first-class degree, I began work towards a DPhil. For about a month, inspired by reading Kathleen Coburn’s account of her work on Coleridge’s Notebooks, I worked on Coleridge. Then I spent more than a year reading Victorian children’s literature, attempting to apply structuralist analysis to George Macdonald and weird Lucy Clifford. Finally, in 1980, I wrote a DPhil thesis on Prose Fantasy and Mythography. I was appointed Lecturer in English at Birkbeck College, London in the same year. Two weeks before my mother died of lung cancer, she resolved, after a lifetime of abstention, to try to become an alcoholic. I did what I could, squirting vodka and orange from a baby-syringe into her numbed mouth, but she had put it off too long. Time passed. In 1987, an editor at Blackwell publishers remarked to me how much he would love it if he could persuade someone to write a book with the words ‘theory’, ‘introduction’ and ‘postmodernism’ in the title. In 1989, my Postmodernist Culture: An Introduction to Theories of the Contemporary was published. More of the time thing went on. In 1992 I became involved in the planning of an interdisciplinary graduate programme to be taught in collaboration between Birkbeck College, the then Tate Gallery, the British Film Institute and the Architectural Association. The London Consortium began operations in 1993. In 2000 my book Dumbstruck appeared, and I thought it had a look of me. Things were going to be different from now on, apart from the time thing. I succeeded Paul Hirst as the Academic Director of the London Consortium in 2002.

Fionnuala Conway

Fionnuala Conway is a musician/composer and multimedia artist. With a background in music and music technology, she has has worked as composer and performer on a number of theatre productions and produced work in a wide variety of forms, from traditional materials to interactive digital media, wearable technology, installations and theatre presentation, including Art of Decision and Urban Chameleon. Her PhD thesis, Exploring Citizenship through Art and Technology, focuses on the creative use of technology to generate awareness of citizenship (and other social issues), with a particular focus on interactive immersive physical environments. She has been lecturing on the M.Phil. in Music and Media Technologies course at Trinity College, Dublin since 2002 and was appointed Course Director in 2006.

Linda Doyle

Linda Doyle is the Director of the Centre for Telecommunications Research (CTVR) and an associate Professor in Trinity College Dublin. Her research is focused in cognitive radio, reconfigurable networks, dynamic spectrum access, spectrum management regimes and spectrum policy. She is the author of ‘Essentials of Cognitive Radio’, Cambridge, 2009. Linda’s research also includes transdisciplinary collaboration with media art and critical design.

Marcia Epstein

Dr. Marcia Jenneth Epstein (Ph.D. University of Toronto 1981) is an interdisciplinary musicologist, cultural
historian and musician whose work has tentacles reaching into acoustics, health sciences, music therapy, feminist theory, auditory communications, and — especially — Acoustic Ecology. She is the author of ‘Prions en chantant’: Devotional Songs of the Trouveres (1997); her current book, ‘Listening to Noise’ — on noise and its effects on health and the culture of communities — is nearing completion.
She is a founding member of the World Forum for Acoustic Ecology; examples of her work can be found at the WFAE website. Marcia teaches at the University of Calgary, Canada, in the Department of Communication and Culture (socio-cultural history, acoustic communications, auditory culture) and the Faculty of Nursing (music and
sound-based therapies).

Mark Fisher

Mark Fisher is a writer and theorist based in Suffolk in the UK. He is the author of Capitalist Realism (Zer0, 2009) and Ghosts of my Life: Writings on Depression, Hauntology and Lost Futures (forthcoming, Zer0, 2011), and the editor of The Resistible Demise of Michael Jackson (Zer0, 2010). He writes regularly for The Wire, Sight and Sound, Film Quarterly and New Statesman. His blog is at http://k-punk.abstractdynamics.org.

Mick Grierson

Dr Mick Grierson is Director of Creative Computing at Goldsmiths College.
Grierson is an experimental artist and researcher specialising in applied real-time audiovisual interaction and cognition research. He has over fifteen years experience in software development for the creative industries, designing for internationally acclaimed TV, Games, Music and Artworks. Recent projects including Christian Marclay’s “The Clock”, the algorithmic music format”bronze”, and “The Dean Rodney Singers”, an installation as part of the Paralympics featuring 72 disabled musicians from around the world. He is also Director of the Daphne Oram Collection, a priceless archive of writings and recordings relating to the life and work of British electronic music pioneer, Daphne Oram, and he instigated the acquisition of her ‘Oramics Machine’ by the UK’s Science Museum in 2009. Throughout 2005-6 he designed motion graphics and immersive digital audiovisual installations for the hit T.V. show Derren Brown: Trick of the Mind, including the now classic “Zombie” experiment, and released the Mabuse Audiovisual Composition environment, which has been downloaded by tens of thousands of VJs and performers. In 2008 he collaborated with the Sonic Arts Network and the South Bank Centre to create Lumisonic, a freely available interactive audiovisual interface for use by the deaf and hard of hearing, and received considerable international press attention after demonstrating his Brain Computer Interface for Music to the BBC. He maintains the open source C++ audio DSP library, Maximilian, a professional level C++ DSP framework for interactive audio, game and application development.

Mark Grimshaw

Mark Grimshaw qualified with a BMus(Hons) at University of Natal, South Africa, an MSc Music Technology from York University, UK and a PhD on the acoustic ecology of the First-Person Shooter at the University of Waikato, New Zealand. After working as a sound engineer in Italy, he moved into academia where he is currently the Obel Professor of Music at Aalborg University, Denmark. He writes extensively on sound in computer games and also writes free, open source software for virtual research environments. He is currently editing the Oxford Handbook of Virtuality to be published in 2013.

Paul Hegarty

Paul Hegarty is the author of Noise/Music (2007) and books on Georges Bataille, Jean Baudrillard. He has also edited collections on ‘formless’ and Dennis Cooper. He teaches philosophy and cultural studies in the Department of French, University College Cork, Ireland, plays in the bands Safe and La Société des Amis du Crime, and runs the record lable dotdotdotmusic

Brandon LaBelle

Brandon LaBelle is an artist and writer. His work explores the space between sound and sociality, using performance and on-site constructions as creative supplements to existing conditions. He is the author of Background Noise: Perspectives on Sound Art (Continuum, 2006) and Acoustic Territories: Sound Culture and Everyday Life (Continuum, 2010). He is the editor of Errant Bodies Press. He also collaborates within the collective working group, Surface Tension, and the working team, e+l.
www.brandonlabelle.net

Takuro Mizuta Lippit

dj sniff (Takuro Mizuta Lippit) believes in the instrumental autonomy of the turntable and the musicianship of the DJ. He is a turntable musician working in the field of improvised and experimental music. His music focuses on the live reconstruction and narratization of the phonographically amplified – the music, the sound, the technology and the past. To achieve this, he uses a unique setup consisting of hand-made hardware interfaces and a custom Max/MSP software along with one turntable and DJ mixer. He is also a concert/event curator for electronic music and a researcher of music technology.
While studying Art History and Philosophy in Tokyo, he was active as a DJ in the underground electronic music scene and formed a collective called smashTV productions which organized genre-mixing events such as anti-Gravity and bistro-Smash!. In 2002, he moved to New York to pursue graduate studies in computer music and physical computing at NYU’s ITP (Interactive Telecommunications Program).
Since 2005 he has been involved with STEIM’s (Studio for Electro-Instrumental Music, Amsterdam) R&D lab and is currently its Artistic Director.

Martin McCabe

Martin has an MA in Film and Television from the School of Communications, Dublin City University and a Diploma in Third Level Teaching and Learning from the Dublin Institute of Technology. He was a lecturer in Cultural and Visual Studies on the BA Photography programme in the School of Media, DIT (1998-2007) and has been a research associate of the Centre for Transcultural Research and Media Practice [ctmp.dit.ie] since 2001. Through the CTMP, he has lectured on the postgraduate Summer School with New York University ‘The Global City and Media Ethnography’ (2006-7) and more recently on a shared module with the MPhil in Ethnic and Racial Studies, Trinity College Dublin entitled ‘Transcultural Practice and Visual Culture(s)’. He has published on film, photography and visual arts, criticism and theory in a number of publications.

Frances Morton

Frances gained her Doctorate in Human Geography from the University of Bristol in 2005, which included an ESRC placement at the Tisch School of the Arts, New York University. She received her undergraduate and Masters degrees at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow , gaining the Royal Geographical Society undergraduate prize in 2001. She worked as a researcher and lecturer at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland from 2005-8 contributing to a major book publication, before acting as Head of Scottish Music in 2008. Frances then was appointed Development Officer at Quality Assurance Agency, managing a portfolio of projects and initiatives in higher education throughout Scotland and Europe, successfully establishing a European network for Recognition of Prior Learning. In 2010, Frances joined Queen Mary University of London, to undertake research into the Peace Process, interviewing ministers, politicians, ex-paramilitaries and peace activists to create an historical archive under embargo for 35 years.
Frances is currently Policy and Public Affairs Manager at the Open University in Ireland. She continues to act as a reviewer for internationally peer-reviewed journals, has been commissioned to write articles for The Companion to Irish Music (2011) and The Encyclopaedia of Music in Ireland (2010). Recently she acted as adjudicator for the BBC Young Traditional Musician of the Year (Scotland) in 2011. She plays flute and piano, and performs regularly at concerts and events.

Nye Parry

Like many composers working in the 21st Century, Nye Parry works in many styles and genres, from site-specific and interactive sound installations to contemporary dance scores, spoken word performance and concert music. After undergraduate and Masters (Music Technology) studies at York University he spent some time as a C programmer, returning to focus more seriously on composition in the mid-nineties, taking a PhD in electroacoustic composition at City University (Limits of Abstraction in Electroacoustic Music), supervised by Simon Emmerson. Since then he has made work for numerous museums and galleries including the Science Museum, the National Maritime Museum, the Heineken Experience and Kew Bridge Steam Museum.
Work for contemporary dance includes numerous collaborations with Yael Flexer, including pieces for Bedlam, Scottish Dance Theatre and the Circus Space, as well as pieces for, Colin Poole, Raphael Bonacela, Charles Linehan, Sarah Rubidge and Bi Ma and a CD-ROM with Mark Baldwin. Nye also composes concert works which have been broadcast internationally, including BBC Radio 3 and France Musique.
Nye has been running the MA in Sonic Arts at Middlesex University since 2003, and teaches in the composition departments at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama and Trinity/Laban.

Pedro Rebelo

Pedro is a composer/digital artist working in electroacoustic music, digital media and installation. His approach to music making is informed by the use of improvisation and interdisciplinary structures. He has been involved in several collaborative projects with visual artists and has created a large body of work exploring the relationships between architecture and music in creating interactive performance and installation environments. His electroacoustic music is featured in various CD sets (Sonic Circuits IV, Discontact III, Exploratory Music from Portugal, ARiADA). Pedro conducts research in the field of digital media, interactive sound and composition. His writings reflect his approach to design and composition by articulating creative practice in a wider understanding of cultural theory. Pedro was Visiting Professor at Stanford University (2007) and the Music Chair for the 2008 International Computer Music Conference. He has been Director of Research at the Sonic Arts Research Centre and is now Director of Education at the School of Music and Sonic Arts, Queen’s University Belfast.

Franziska Schroeder

Franziska is a saxophonist and theorist, originally from Berlin/Germany.
In 2006 Franziska was awarded a PhD from the University of Edinburgh for her research into performance and theories of embodiment. She has since written for many international journals, including Leonardo, Organised Sound, Performance Research, Cambridge Publishing and Routledge. She has published a book on performance and the threshold and an edited volume on user-generated content for Cambridge Scholars.
Franziska has performed with many international musicians including Joan La Barbara, Pauline Oliveros, Stelarc, the Avatar Orchestra, Carin Levine, Chris Brown, Tom Arthurs and Evan Parker. Franziska has several CDs on the creative source label, a recording on the SLAM label with a semi-autonomous technological artifact, guitarist Han-earl Park and saxophonist Bruce Coates (www.io001b.com/sounds/slamcd531), and recently released a recording on ‘Buster and Friends’ (digital download) with Han-earl Park (guitar): www.busterandfriends.com/2012/06/12/park-schroeder-cork-03-26-09/
Franziska has been an AHRC and a RCUK Research Fellow at the Sonic Arts Research Centre, Belfast and is now a Lecturer at the School of Creative Arts, Belfast, where she coaches 3rd year recitalists and MA performance students. www.sarc.qub.ac.uk/~fschroeder/

Jonathan Sterne

Jonathan Sterne teaches in the Department of Art History and Communication Studies and the History and Philosophy of Science Program at McGill University. He is author of The Audible Past: Cultural Origins of Sound Reproduction (Duke, 2003), MP3: The Meaning of a Format (Duke 2012); and numerous articles on media, technologies and the politics of culture. He is also editor of The Sound Studies Reader (Routledge, 2012). Visit his website at http://sterneworks.org .

Tim Stott

Dr. Tim Stott is Assistant Lecturer in Art History and Theory at Dublin Institute of Technology and an Associate Researcher at the Graduate School of Creative Arts and Media, Dublin. He has published widely on contemporary art in journals such as Afterall, Art Review, Circa, Frieze, Printed Project, and Variant.
Recent essays include ‘The Visions of Blind Friends’, Project Issues II, 2010 and ‘Knotting Things’, Ireland in Venice: Sarah Browne, 2009. Recent conference papers include ‘Forms of Play in the Social System of Art’ at the 2009 Joint Society for European Philosophy and Forum for European Philosophy conference, Cardiff; ‘A Brief Genealogy of Immaterial Labour and the Creative Economy’, It’s more than the Economy, Stupid! Part I: Immaterial Labour and the Creative Economy, Graduate School of Creative Arts & Media, 2009; ‘Collective as Form, Playground as Medium’, Collectively, Third Annual Philosophy and the Arts Conference, Stony Brook University Manhattan, March 2010; ‘And What if We too see Nothing? Thoughts towards a Generic Archive’, Tables of Thought, European Artistic Research Network, Helsinki, April 2010.
Tim is also a member of the editorial committee for Circa art magazine and an advisor to the Artist’s Panel at IMMA. His research interests include the politics of play and participation, art criticism and interpretation, art pedagogy and the history of the art school, contemporary aesthetics, animal communications, and the critique of precarious labour.

Atau Tanaka

Atau Tanaka was born in Tokyo, and was raised in the U.S. He bridges the fields of media art, experimental music, and research. He moved to Paris with a residency at the Cité des Arts to work at IRCAM, was Artistic Ambassador for Apple France, and was researcher at Sony Computer Science Laboratory Paris. He was also active in the Tokyo noise music and media arts scenes. Atau creates sensor-based musical instruments for performance and exhibition, and is known for his work with biosignal interfaces. His recent work seeks to harness collective musical creativity in mobile environments, seeking out the continued place of the artist in democratised digital forms. His work has been presented at Ars Electronica, SFMOMA, Eyebeam, V2, ICC, and ZKM. His work is supported by the Daniel Langlois Foundation, UK and French research funding bodies, and the European Research Council (ERC). He has been mentor at NESTA, Artistic Co-Director of STEIM in Amsterdam, Director of Culture Lab Newcastle, and is currently Professor of Media Computing at Goldsmiths, University of London.

TeZ (Maurizio Martinucci)

Maurizio Martinucci (aka TeZ) is an Italian interdisciplinary artist and producer, living and working in Amsterdam since January 2002, who has collaborated with, amongst others, Scanner, Kim Cascone, Taylor Deupree, Honor Harger, Luca Spagnoletti and Domenico Sciajno. He uses technology as a means to explore synesthesia and the relationship between sound, light and space. He focuses primarily on generative compositions with spatialized sound for live performances and immersive environments. In his works he’s always adopted custom developed software, original techniques of sound spatialization and visualizations realized with various analogue and digital methods. In recent years his research has extended to the ideation and creation of specific architectural structures and unconventional sound and light propagation methods to enhance immersivity. TeZ is also the brainfather of the “Optofonica” platform for Synesthetic Media and Sound Spatialization which has extensively showcased in various festivals and venues worldwide with exhibitions, screenings and performances. He established the Optofonica Laboratory for Immersive ArtScience in Amsterdam in 2009 together with his fellow artists Evelina Domnitch and Dmitry Gelfand.

Barry Truax

Barry Truax is a Professor in the School of Communication at Simon Fraser University where he teaches courses in acoustic communication and electroacoustic music. He has worked with the World Soundscape Project, editing its Handbook for Acoustic Ecology, and has published a book Acoustic Communication dealing with all aspects of sound and technology. As a composer, Truax is best known for his work with the PODX computer music system which he has used for tape solo works and those which combine tape with live performers or computer graphics. A selection of these pieces may be heard on the Compact Discs Digital Soundscapes, Pacific Rim, Song of Songs, Inside, Twin Souls, Islands, and Spirit Journies, all on the Cambridge Street Records label, plus the double CD of the opera Powers of Two. In 1991 his work, Riverrun, was awarded the Magisterium at the International Competition of Electroacoustic Music in Bourges, France, a category open only to electroacoustic composers of 20 or more years experience.

Website: www.sfu.ca/~truax

Mick Wilson

Mick Wilson is an artist, writer and educator. He is Head of Fine Art at DIT and Dean of the Graduate School of Creative Arts and Media Dublin (www.gradcam.ie) (2007-2010) and the Irish partner for the European Art Research Network (www.artresearch.eu). He is a graduate of the NCAD and Trinity College Dublin.